Linden Flower Liqueur

The finished liqueur ready for 5-6 months of aging.

This macerated liqueur is made using the flowers of Linden trees, which bloom in Seattle in mid to late June.  In Provence, where lindens are thought to have soporific qualities, the collecting and drying of linden flowers for teas,  alcohols and tinctures is a cottage industry.  Because the fragrance of the flowers is subtle, I don’t use any other spices or flavorings for this liqueur.

Linden Blossom Liqueur

Ingredients

  • 1.5 bottles vodka (good quality (about 1.25 liters total))
  • 8 cups linden blossoms (freshly picked)
  • 70g sugar
  • .15l water

Preparation

1. Sort through the flowers to make sure that all leaves, withered blossoms, stems etc are removed. Put the blossoms into a clean glass container large enough to hold them easily. Cover with the vodka, and put a clean glass or stainless weight on the top of the blossoms so that they remain submerged.
2. Cover the container with an airtight cover and leave in a dark, cool place for 15 days.
3. Remove the cover and the weight from the jar. Strain the vodka off the flowers through a fine chinois. Wash and dry the jar, discarding the blossoms and return the strained vodka to the jar.
4. Mix together the sugar and the water in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil. Remove from the heat and let stand 1 minute. Boil again. Strain this syrup into the vodka. Cover tightly (note at this point you may put the liqueur in a clean bottle and cork it, if you wish) and leave in a cool, dark place for 6 months to mellow.
5. Enjoy this delicately flavored liqueur as a digestif.

 

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3 Responses to Linden Flower Liqueur

  1. Earlene says:

    Hello,
    I had a bottle of Czars linden flower vodka. can’t get it now. I tried to steep vodka with dried flowers but did not work, poor flavor. Where in Seattle do Lindens grow? I live in Kirkland but would be glad to travel to get some fresh blossoms. I don’t drink much so I only need enough for a bottle or two Will you share a source of blossoms?

    • Jim says:

      Lindens are very common in Seattle and grow well in our climate. I can particularly recommend First Hill and Beacon Hill. Try 9th Avenue between Jefferson and Seneca.

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